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F.A.Q.

Q- What is a cup-face design?

Q- Why is a cup-face design hotter that a typical face insert design?

Q-What does OLA stand for?

Q- How do I choose the right loft?

Q- Where is the CG located on the Bobby Jones Black drivers?

Q- How do I set the face angle on my driver or fairway wood?

Q- What lengths do the drivers come in?

Q- What custom options are available?

Q- What makes the fairway woods special?

Q- The profile or shape of the woods is very different from the other models. Why?

Q- Why don’t you make a 13 degree fairway wood?

Q- Is the 15 degree a 3-wood or is the 17 degree a 3-wood?

Q- Why do you say that the 3-wood is the most important club in the bag?

Q- Why don’t you make a 5-wood?

Q- Are the inverted runners on the sole cosmetic or functional?

Q- The Bobby Jones Black hybrids don’t look like any others. Why?

Q- Why are the sole and the leading edge so contoured?

Q- Why are Bobby Jones Black hybrids adjustable for lie?

Q- How do I know what lie angle is right for me?

Q- How do I set the lie angle on the hybrids?

Q- Why aren’t the hybrids adjustable for face angle?

Q- What lofts correspond to each iron?

Q- The Rouge clubs are so unusual looking. There must be a reason. Why?

Q- The driver seems to have a lot of loft. What loft is it?

Q- What are some of the other features that are different from the men’s line?

Q- Why don’t you make hybrids for women?

Q- How is that and why?

Q- What lofts are available?

Q- They look too pretty to hit!

Q- What is a cup-face design?
A- Depending on whether it’s a driver, fairway wood or hybrid, a sheet of material is formed to the shape of a shallow cup. The edges are joined to the clubhead’s body using a patented brazing process necessary to fuse dissimilar metals. The joint line is recessed away from the face or hitting area so as not to interfere with the natural flexing of the face area. This produces a hotter face and more consistent ball flight on off-center hits.

Q- Why is a cup-face design hotter that a typical face insert design?
A- The cup-face design allows for a thinning of the edges to enhance the trampoline effect…making for a more lively face. Since the joint line is not within the striking area, there are no rigid seams to reduce the maximum flex of the face.

Q-What does OLA stand for?
A- Optimum Launch Angle. I don’t put 13 degrees because if I put that on the sole,
 most men would not give it a try. The fact is that with the reduced spin rate the cup-face design produces, the higher loft will actually increase distance for most golfers. Think of shooting water out of a garden hose. If you shoot the stream parallel to the ground, notice where the water hits the ground. Now raise the stream to shoot higher and you’ll see that it increases that distance from you to where it hits the ground.

Q- How do I choose the right loft?
A- I recommend going with slightly more loft than you have been using due to the lower spin rates. The way balls are designed today, the longer you can keep it in the air, the more distance you will get. There is a big difference between a shot that is ballooning and one that is high but boring. The latter is ideal. Unless you swing over 100 mph, forget about the 9 degree driver. If you are under 90 mph, I would strongly consider the OLA ( 12 degrees). Remember…loft is your friend and you always get more distance through the air than you do once the ball hits the ground.

Q- Where is the CG located on the Bobby Jones Black drivers?
A- We position the CG low and to the rear for higher launch and more face stability on off center hits. Several companies tout positioning the CG higher in the clubhead and closer to the face or striking area. This is advantageous only if you have a swingspeed of over 110 mph, which is what Tour professionals have. A deeper CG stabilizes the clubhead on off center misses. Tour pros don’t need that kind of forgiveness, but most of us do.

Q- How do I set the face angle on my driver or fairway wood?
A- At the bottom of the soleplate you will see an opening with an Allen set screw.
            Use the wrench provided to turn the screw head counter clockwise to loosen
            completely. Pull the shaft apart from the head. Notice the white dot at the 9
            o’clock position to the upper right hand corner of the face along the hosel.
            That is the positioning dot. Look above that on the adapter piece and you will
            see a number. Zero represents square or neutral; +1 denotes one degree closed;
           +2 is for two degrees closed. Rotate the shaft to the desired position and
            re-tighten the head.

Q- What lengths do the drivers come in?
A- 45 inches is standard but you can request whatever length fits best for you.

Q- What custom options are available?
A-   You may request any shaft, shaft length or grip options by calling the tech line
listed on this site. There may be an up-charge for certain exotic shaft

Q- What makes the fairway woods special?
A- The cup-face design’s advantages are most realized in the fairway woods because it not only creates a hotter face, but a much lighter one. This allows us to move more weight away from the front wall or face, and place extra weight in the sole area for a lower CG. This weight relocation creates a higher launch angle for better results from tight fairway lies. I also incorporate a shallow face design which instills confidence at the address position…making it look like the ball is on a tee.

Q- The profile or shape of the woods is very different from the other models. Why?
A- The clubheads have the look of someone who has hand ground over one million woods in a 45 year career as a craftsman. The graceful lines frame the ball in harmony with the shaft and hands. My designs have the timeless, classic look of the clubs created back in the 40’s and 50’s but with all of today’s technology. My goal is to create clubs that if Mr. Jones were alive today, he could put the club at the address position and admiringly say,’ I can play with this.’

Q- Why don’t you make a 13 degree fairway wood?
A- I have found that only very strong players can benefit from a low lofted fairway wood and I have chosen to ignore that segment of the market. Most players looking for 13 degrees fairway woods actually 2-woods for use off the tee on tight holes. These kind of fairway woods are popular on Tour but they are used only off the tee in place of a driver. Think about how often you see a Tour player use a fairway wood from the actual fairway. The answer is never. These woods tend to be deeper in face depth and are being touted by manufacturers as ‘super 3-woods’ but they are unhittable for amateurs off the deck in the fairway.

Q- Is the 15 degree a 3-wood or is the 17 degree a 3-wood?
A- They are both 3-woods. The 15 degree is considered a true 3-wood in today’s world; however, that loft is too strong for most recreational players to effectively hit off the deck. Unless you catch the ball perfectly, you’re going to get a disappointing shot. Thin shots will get you line drives that stop well short of the intended distance you required. For that reason, most of us are much better off using a 17 degree fairway wood which is like a 4-wood but comes with a 3-wood length shaft. This is how you get 3-wood distance but with 4 wood playability and forgiveness. Remember, your 3- wood is the most important club in your bag.

Q- Why do you say that the 3-wood is the most important club in the bag?
A- Think about this: With all of the innovations we as designers have made in drivers to increase your distance off the tee, what good is it to have a fairway wood that  can’t take advantage of that extra driver distance? If you have to grab a hybrid out of the bag for your second shot on long par 4’s or on par 5’s, because you have no confidence in your 3-wood, then you have thrown away any distance advantage you enjoyed from your high tech driver because no hybrid will go as far as a 3-wood that performs flawlessly for you. What good is 20 extra yards off the tee if you give it back by having to use a hybrid instead of a 3-wood? It’s tough to make par when you’re lying ‘two’ well short of the green in the fairway.

Q- Why don’t you make a 5-wood?
A- I feel that the 17 degree wood is a magical club. Grip it at the end for 3-wood distance and you can choke up an inch or two, take the same swing and you have 5-wood distance. It’s really two clubs in one, and that allows you to add another hybrid or wedge in the bag to really lower your scores.

Q- Are the inverted runners on the sole cosmetic or functional?
A- They are very functional. They create much less drag when in contact with the turf. Many competitors have grooves or slots on their soles that run perpendicular to the clubhead’s path through the swing. These slots grab the turf creating twist and preventing solid contact with the ball…and besides, you’re always cleaning out the dirt and grass from the groove. That should tell you how much resistance that design is creating.

 Q- The Bobby Jones Black hybrids don’t look like any others. Why?
A-   I often hear that comment and I take it as a supreme compliment! I design clubs for functionality and performance first….and then I work on the aesthetics. I am fond of saying that designing ugly clubs is against my religion. The profile of our hybrids is a modification of the cleek styled clubs of the early 1900’s. They are much wider than the offerings of our competitors with the rear apex positioned perfectly behind the center of the face to increase stability on shots from trouble lies. If you think of the face as one side of a triangle and the rear apex as a point of the triangle, you can envision the power of what I call the “Triangle of Stability’; The pointed toe gracefully accentuates the sweeping profile of the head and concentrates the mass and your eye, directly behind the striking surface.

Q- Why are the sole and the leading edge so contoured?
A- Hybrids should be designed for versatility so they can be played effectively from a variety of lies. Most other hybrids are designed for Tour pros who use hybrids off the tee or from the fairway where they have perfect lies. That is why they prefer flat soles with straight leading edges. Once again, a Tour design is forced upon amateurs with less than satisfying results. The rest of us need clubs that are effective out of rough, fairway traps, hard pan and side hill lies…in addition to perfect fairway lies and use off the tee. We need all the help we can get. The contoured sloe radius ensures that the heel or toe won’t catch or grab the clubhead and twist it…producing a bad shot. The inverted runners glide through rough and sand minimizing drag.

Q- Why are Bobby Jones Black hybrids adjustable for lie?
 A-   First of all, no other hybrids give you that option of lie angle adjustability. Why? Because their designers have no imagination; They just copy each other and don’t think out of the box. I started with the premise that hybrids should be designed to replace your long irons. They should NOT be designed to replace your fairway woods. Following this thought process, hybrids and irons are accuracy clubs foremost, and distance clubs secondarily. For example, if you are too far from the green to reach with an 8-iron, you should select your 7-iron and use the same swing to reach the green. The same holds for hybrids. Reach for your 21 degree if the 25 degree won’t get you there. Sounds simple enough but if your lie angle is not fitted properly, you will have the right distance but will consistently miss your intended target left or right…and this applies to both your hybrids and your irons.

 Q- How do I know what lie angle is right for me?
 A- Usually, a consistent shot patter of pushed shots indicates the need for a more upright setting. Conversely, pulled shots need a flatter lie adjustment. Obviously, longer or shorter arm lengths than normal need to be considered, but generally players 5’7” and shorter will prefer the flat lie setting and those between 5’8” and 6’1” will go with standard. Those taller should consider longer length shafts.

Q- How do I set the lie angle on the hybrids?
 A- The same way as the fairway woods only the alignment dot is at the 6 o’clock position. The S is for standard and the F is for flat.

Q- Why aren’t the hybrids adjustable for face angle?
A- I feel that a square face setting is best for working the shot pattern necessary out of difficult lies. There would be no chance for success out of the rough with a closed face.

Q- What lofts correspond to each iron?
 A- Distance is a relative term because we have different swing speeds, but generally, this is the range:
18 degrees…..2-iron….210+ yards
21 degrees…..3-iron….190-200
25 degrees…..4 iron….175-185
30 degrees…..5 iron….160-170
35 degrees…..6 iron….145-155

WOMENS ROUGE LINE
 During the 45 plus years of my design career, there have been few projects that have stirred my passion like the Bobby Jones Rouge line for women. Everything I have learned about creating high performance clubs that are also easy to hit, has been incorporated in this line. This line is unique in all the Industry; packed with more technology than the men’s line. This is a serious line of clubs, designed specifically for recreational players who want to improve their games while having fun doing it. Bobby Jones Rouge is for women who don’t care about following what others are using. They only care about what works for them and what is going to help them enjoy the game. No hype…no boxed set deals…no cutesy colors….just pure innovation and unparalleled performance that is evident from the first swing.
 Over the years I have seen golfers with slow swing speeds, particularly women, struggle with ball trajectory and distance. It concerns me that so many women drop out of Golf becoming discouraged and frustrated with the game. As we get older, Golf expands friendships, encourages travel and exercise, and provides an appreciation of the outdoors…and thus, remains the greatest game.

Q- The Rouge clubs are so unusual looking. There must be a reason. Why?
A- Of course there is! We have a patent on the profile of the clubhead. Notice the rear apex situated on the lower half of the club. This promotes rotation of the toe into the square position at impact. Players with slower swing speed struggle to get the face square at the moment of impact and positioning of the mass in that lower quadrant helps tremendously in reducing pushed or sliced shots. In fact, it is common at demo days for women to lose sight of their first few shots with the Rouge line because they are accustomed to seeing the ball go low and right…and the ball has actually gone high and down the middle with a slight draw! It takes some getting used to

 Q- The driver seems to have a lot of loft. What loft is it?
 A- I prefer to say it has the proper loft! It has 14 degrees. Most women’s drivers have 12 to 13 degrees, which is not enough to maximize distance. You always get more distance through the air than on the ground. Notice how deep the face is at the toe and how shallow it is towards heel. This feature helps eliminate shots to the right.

Q- What are some of the other features that are different from the men’s line?
 A-The fairway woods, is particular, are very different than anything else on the market. They feature much thinner maraging steel faces in a more shallow design for greater ball velocity and higher ball trajectory with slower swing speeds. Since slower swing speeds reduce the chance of having the face collapse, I push the durability limit by using high strength maraging steel alloy faces that are only 1.6mm thick as opposed to 4 mm stainless steel faces. By going thin I can reduce the weight of the face area and transfer that saved weight to the sole for a lower CG. Nearly every other manufacturer uses weaker, stainless steel for their faces material. They don’t believe that creating a hotter face will bring more distance at slower swing speeds. I disagree. It’s also much less expensive than high strength maraging steel and that’s important when selling boxed sets. It’s all about profit…not performance. The shallow faces also make the ball appear to be on a tee when played off the fairway, which increases confidence…producing a better swing. The appearance of our fairway woods as they set up behind the ball is unlike any other.

Q- Why don’t you make hybrids for women?
 A- I believe the single worst idea in club design for women if the hybrid. They have been hyped as a panacea to all ills…easier to hit that irons, more accurate, etc, etc, when in fact, they are poor alternatives to properly designed fairway woods. Typically, hybrids are stubby and narrow in profile with higher and shallow CGs, making them more difficult to launch on a high enough trajectory to stop shots to the green. Their flat soles make them impossible to play from irregular lies and rough. They may be better than irons but they are clearly inferior to our uniquely designed fairway woods.

Q- How is that and why?
 A- The wider body of a fairway wood moves the CG away from the face area. This is called deepening the CG, which stabilizes the club on off center misses…resulting in straighter shots or more forgiveness. The larger overall size of the fairway wood increases confidence that solid contact will be made, versus the smaller, narrow hybrid head. The real key to our versatility is that we incorporate the only design advantage a hybrid has….a narrow sole area for less drag. The width of our sole is that of a hybrid so the clubhead’s sweeping path to the ball is minimally affected by contact with the turf. This is visibly accentuated by the beautiful scalloped sole design.

Q- What lofts are available?
 A- The lofts and lengths are set to provide the perfect distance gaps between each club.
Driver….14 degrees
3-wood...18 degrees
5-wood...23 degrees
7-wood...28 degrees…...5-iron
9-wood…33 degrees…..7 iron
11-wood..38 degrees…..8/9 iron

Q- They look too pretty to hit!
A- They are…but they actually perform better than they look!